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Biblical Studies
Certificate

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

This certificate program is designed to equip people with the knowledge and skills necessary to study the Bible with familiarity and confidence. Graduates of this program will be able to read the Bible in context, make thematic connections across the testaments, and explain how the Bible has been interpreted throughout church history.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS (18 Units)

BS101 - OT Survey

3 Units

An overview of Genesis through Malachi, focusing on the literary contents, historical contexts, and theological contributions of the Old Testament books. Highlights the major historical people, places, and events of the Old Testament while mapping them onto the overarching redemptive storyline.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the significance of key people, places, and events in the Old Testament.
  • Identify the book and chapter references for important Old Testament concepts and events.
  • Describe the historical setting of the Old Testament books.
  • Summarize the messages and theological contributions of the Old Testament books, and their contemporary Christian relevance.

BS102 - NT Survey

3 Units

An overview of Matthew through Revelation, focusing on the literary contents, historical contexts, and theological contributions of the New Testament books. Highlights the major historical people, places, and events of the New Testament while mapping them onto the overarching redemptive storyline.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the significance of key people, places, and events in the New Testament and the intertestamental period.
  • Identify the book and chapter references for important New Testament concepts and events.
  • Describe the historical setting of the New Testament books
  • Summarize the messages and theological contributions of the New Testament books, and their contemporary Christian relevance.

BS201 - Introduction to the Bible

3 Units

An introduction to the origin, transmission, and translation of the Bible, including its inspiration, canonization, preservation, and textual reconstruction. Addresses the major historical-critical questions relating to the Bible’s authority, and provides the student with an apologetic for the inspiration and inerrancy of Scripture.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain when and how the biblical books were inspired and canonized as Scripture.
  • Describe how ancient biblical manuscripts were transmitted and the original autographs reconstructed.
  • Contrast the various methods used in modern Bible translation.
  • Defend the authority and veracity of Scripture, as well as the significance of these doctrines for the Christian life and ministry.

BS202 - Biblical Intrepretation

3 Units

An introduction to the principles and methods of biblical interpretation, focusing on the history of interpretation, the literal-historical-grammatical approach, and the primary tools for biblical study. Hermeneutical strategies will be used to interpret various literary genres, examine historical and literary contexts, analyze structural relationships, perform word studies, and develop principles for practical application.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define key terms and concepts relating to biblical interpretation.
  • Identify significant approaches, trends, and presuppositions of biblical interpreters, both past and present.
  • Interpret various genres of biblical literature from a dispensational perspective.
  • Employ the essential tools and methods of biblical research.

BS301 - Romans

3 Units

An expository study of Paul’s epistle to the Romans, stressing its contribution to the doctrines of salvation and sanctification, and to understanding the place of Israel and the church in the divine plan. Assesses important perspectives on how to interpret Romans and explores how the theological and ethical principles of this epistle contribute to spiritual formation and relevant issues in contemporary society.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the message of Romans within its historical-cultural context and its location within salvation history.
  • Identify the major theological themes of Romans and where they emerge in the epistle.
  • Evaluate prominent views on the theology of Romans.
  • Develop practical principles for Christian living in light of the message of Romans.

TH201 - Church History

3 Units

An historical survey of the development of the church and its doctrines, from the foundational period to the end of the contemporary. Highlights key persons and influences, as well as significant theological disputes and ecclesiological outcomes.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify key persons and dates in church history.
  • Explain the primary causes and consequences of the early ecumenical councils.
  • Summarize the content and contributions of important creeds of the early church.
  • Explain the causes and consequences of the Protestant Reformation.
  • Summarize the origin and development of the church in America.
  • Correlate ancient heresies with modern developments in theology.
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